Section 204-213 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 204-213 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 204-213 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act is under Chapter 19 (Offences relating to religious worship) and Chapter 20 (Ordeal, Witchcraft, Juju and Criminal Charms) of the Act.

Section 204 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Insult to a religion

Any person who does an act which any class of persons consider as a public insult on their religion, with
the intention that they should consider the act such an insult, and any person who does an unlawful act
with the knowledge that any class of persons will consider it such an insult, is guilty of a misdemeanour
and is liable to imprisonment for two years.

Section 205 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Offering violence to officiating ministers of religion

Any person who‐
(1) by threats or force prevents or attempts to prevent any minister of religion from lawfully
officiating in any place of religious worship, or from performing his duty in the lawful burial of the dead
in any cemetery or other burial place; or
(2) by threats or force obstructs or attempts to obstruct, any minister of religion while so
officiating or performing his duty; or
(3) assaults, or, upon or under the pretence of executing any civil process, arrests any minister
of religion who is engaged in, or is, to the knowledge of the offender, about to engage in, any of the
offices or duties aforesaid, or who is, to the knowledge of the offender, going to perform the same or
returning from the performance thereof,
is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for two years.

Section 206 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Disturbing religious worship

Any person who wilfully and without lawful justification or excuse, the proof of which lies on him,
disquiets, or disturbs any meeting of persons lawfully assembled for religious worship, or assaults any
person lawfully officiating at any such meeting, or any of the persons there assembled, is guilty of a
simple offence and is liable to imprisonment for two months or to a fine of ten naira.

CHAPTER 20 – Ordeal, witchcraft, juju and criminal charms

Section 207 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Unlawful trial by ordeal: prohibited juju

(1) The trial by the ordeal of sasswood, esere‐bean, or the poison, boiling oil, fire, immersion in
water or exposure to the attacks of crocodiles or other wild animals, or by any ordeal which is likely to
result in the death of or bodily injury to any party to the proceeding, is unlawful.
(2) The President or, as the case may be, the Governor of a State may by order prohibit the
worship or invocation of any juju which may appear to him to involve or tend towards the commission
of any crime or breach of peace, or to the spread of any infectious or contagious disease.

Section 208 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Directing, etc., unlawful trial by ordeal

Any person who directs or controls or presides at any trial by ordeal which is unlawful, is guilty of a
felony and is liable, when the trial which such person directs, controls or presides at results in the death
of any party to the proceeding, to the punishment of death and m every other case, to imprisonment for
ten years.

Section 209 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Being present at, or making poison for, unlawful trial by ordeal

Any person who‐
(a) is present at or takes part in any trial by ordeal which is unlawful; or
(b) makes, sells or assists or takes part in making or selling, or has in his possession for sale
or use any poison or thing which is intended to be used for the purpose of any trial by
ordeal which is unlawful,
is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for one year.

Section 210 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Offences in relation to witchcraft and juju

Any person who‐
(a) by his statements or actions represents himself to be a witch or to have the power of
witchcraft; or
(b) accuses or threatens to accuse any person with being a witch or with having the power
of witchcraft; or
(c) makes or sells or uses, or assists or takes part in making or selling or using or has in his
possession or represents himself to be in possession of any juju, drug or charm which is
intended to be used or reported to possess the power to prevent or delay any person
from doing an act which such person has a legal right to do, or to compel any person to
do an act which such person has a legal right to refrain from doing, or which is alleged or
reported to possess the power of causing any natural phenomenon or any disease or
epidemic; or
(d) directs or controls or presides at or is present at or takes part in the worship or
invocation of any juju which is prohibited by an order of the President or the Governor
of a State; or
(e) is in possession of or has control over any human remains which are used or are
intended to be used in connection with the worship or invocation of any juju; or
(f) makes or uses or assists in making or using, or has in his possession anything
whatsoever the making, use or possession of which has been prohibited by an order as
being or believed to be associated with human sacrifice or other unlawful practice,
is guilty of misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for two years.

Section 211 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Chiefs permitting unlawful ordeal and prohibited juju worship

Any chief who directly or indirectly permits, promotes, encourages or facilitates any trial by ordeal
which is unlawful, or the worship or invocation of any juju which has been prohibited by an order, or
who knowing of such trial, worship or invocation, or intended trial, worship or invocation, does not
forthwith report the same to an administrative officer, is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment
for three years.
[L.N. 257 of 1959.]
The offender cannot be arrested without warrant.

Section 212 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Destruction of place where unlawful ordeal or prohibited juju worship is held

Any house, grove or place in which it has been customary to hold any trial by ordeal which is unlawful,
or the worship or invocation of any juju which is prohibited by an order, may, together with all articles
found therein, be destroyed or erased upon the order of any court by such persons as the court may
direct.
[L.N. 257 of 1959.]

Section 213 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Criminal charms

Any person who‐
(a) makes, sells or keeps for sale or for hire or reward, any fetish or charm which is pretended or
reputed to possess power to protect burglars, robbers, thieves or other malefactors, or to aid or
assist in any way in the perpetration of any burglary, housebreaking, robbery or theft, or in the
perpetration of any offence whatsoever, or to prevent, hinder or delay the detection of or
conviction for any offence whatsoever; or
(b) is found having in his possession without lawful and reasonable excuse (the proof of which
excuse shall lie on such person) any such fetish or charm as aforesaid,
is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for five years.


Credit: https://lawsofnigeria.placng.org/laws/C38.pdf

Section 190-203 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 190-203 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 190-203 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act is under Chapter 18 (Miscellaneous offences against public authority) of the Act.

Section 190 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

False declaration as to execution of sentence of death

Any person who subscribes a certificate or declaration as to the execution of a sentence of death, which,
in any material particular, is to his knowledge false, is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for
fourteen years.

Section 190A of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

False statements in application for passports

Any person who for the purpose of procuring a passport, whether for himself or any other individual,
makes or causes to be made in any written application to a public officer a statement which to the
knowledge of such person is false in any material particular, is guilty of an offence and is liable to
imprisonment for one year.

Section 191 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

False statements in statements required to be under oath or solemn declaration

Any person who, on any occasion on which a person making a statement touching any matter is
required by law to make it on oath, or under some sanction which may by law be substituted for an
oath, or is required to verify it by solemn declaration or affirmation, makes a statement touching such
matter which, in any material particular, is to his knowledge false, and verifies it on oath, or under such
other sanction or by solemn declaration or affirmation, is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment
for seven years.
The offender cannot be arrested without warrant.

Section 192 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

False declarations and statements

Any person who, on any occasion on which he is permitted or required by law to make a statement or
declaration before any person authorised by law to permit it to be made before him, makes a statement
or declaration before that person which, in any material particular, is to his knowledge false, is guilty of
a felony and is liable to imprisonment for three years.
The offender cannot be arrested without warrant.

Section 193 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Evidence

A person cannot be convicted of any of the offences defined in sections 191 and 192 of this Code upon
the uncorroborated testimony of one witness.

Section 194 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Shooting at customs boats or officers

Any person who‐
(1) shoots at a vessel of any kind which is in use by a customs officer while engaged in the
execution of his duty as such officer; or
(2) shoots at, wounds, or causes any grievous harm to a customs officer while engaged in the
execution of his duty in the prevention of smuggling, or any person acting in aid of a customs officer
while so engaged,
is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for life.

Section 195 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Resisting officers engaged in preventing smuggling

Any person who with violence assaults, obstructs, or resists a customs officer, or any person duly
employed for the prevention of smuggling, while engaged in the execution of his duty in the prevention
of smuggling, or any person acting in aid of any such officer or person while so engaged, is guilty of a
felony and is liable to imprisonment for three years.

Section 196 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Resisting customs officers

Any person who‐
(1) assaults or obstructs a customs officer, or any person duly employed for the prevention of
smuggling , while engaged in the execution of his duty under any law relating to the customs, or in the
seizure of any goods claimed to be liable to forfeiture under any such law, or any person acting in aid of
any such officer or person while so engaged; or
(2) rescues or attempts to rescue any goods which have been seized under any such law; or
(3) before, at, or after, the seizure of any goods under any such law, staves, breaks or destroys the
goods, with intent to prevent the seizure or the securing of the goods, or attempts to do any such act,
is guilty of a simple offence and is liable to a fine of two hundred naira.

Section 197 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Resisting public officers

Any person who in any manner obstructs or resists any public officer while engaged in the
discharge or attempted discharge of the duties of his office under any order, Act, law, or Statute, or
obstructs or resists any person while engaged in the discharge or attempted discharge of any duty
imposed on him by an order, Act, law, or statute, is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to
imprisonment for two years.
[L.N. 112 of 1964. L.N. 139 of 1965.]

Section 198 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Refusal by public officer to perform duty

Any person who, being a person employed in the public service and being required by any order, Act,
law, or statute, to do any act by virtue of his employment, perversely and without lawful excuse omits or
refuses to do any such act, is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for two years. A
prosecution for any offence under this section of this Code shall not be instituted except by or with the
consent of a law officer.
[L.N. 112 of 1964.]

Section 199 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Neglect of peace officer to suppress riot

Any person who, being a peace officer and having notice that there is a riot in his neighbourhood,
without reasonable excuse omits to do his duty in suppressing such riot, is guilty of a misdemeanour and
is liable to imprisonment for two years.

Section 200 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Neglect to aid in suppressing riot

Any person who, having reasonable notice that he is required to assist any peace officer in suppressing a
riot, without reasonable excuse omits to do so, is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to
imprisonment for one year.

Section 201 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Neglect to aid in arresting offenders

Any person who, having reasonable notice that he is required to assist any peace officer or member of
the police force in arresting any person, or in preserving the peace, without reasonable excuse omits to
do so, is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for one year.

Section 202 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Disobedience to Act, law, or statute

Any person who, without lawful excuse, the proof of which lies on him, does any act which he is by the
provisions of any order, Act, law, or statute, forbidden to do, or omits to do any act which he is by the
provisions of any such order, Act, law or statute, required to do, is guilty of a misdemeanour, unless
some mode of proceeding against him for such disobedience is expressly provided by order, Act, law, or
statute, and is intended to be exclusive of all other punishment.
[L.N. 112 of 1964.]
The offender is liable to imprisonment for one year.
In this section, the terms “Act” and “law” do not include an order, regulation or proclamation made
under the authority of an Act or a law.

Section 203 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Disobedience to lawful order issued by constituted authority

Any person who, without lawful excuse, the proof of which lies on him, disobeys any lawful order issued
by any person authorised by any order, Act, law, or statute, to make the order, is guilty of a
misdemeanor, unless some mode of proceeding against him for such disobedience is expressly provided
by order, Act, law, or statute, and is intended to be exclusive of all other punishment.
[L.N. 112 of 1964.]
The offender is liable to imprisonment for one year.


Credit: https://lawsofnigeria.placng.org/laws/C38.pdf

Section 176-189 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 176-189 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 161-189 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act is under Chapter 17 (Offences relating to Posts and Telecommunications) of the Act.

Section 176 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Carrying letters otherwise than by post

Any person who, not being authorised by the Postmaster‐General
[1966 No. 84.]
(1) sends or conveys a letter otherwise than by post; or
(2) takes charge of a letter for conveyance,
is guilty of a simple offence and is liable to a fine of one hundred naira.
This section of this Code does not extend to a letter sent or conveyed to a place in Nigeria with which
postal communication has not been established, nor to a letter exceeding the weight prescribed by law
for letters sent by post, nor to a letter sent by a private friend without hire or reward, on his way,
journey, or travel, so as such letter be delivered to the party to whom it is directed, nor to a letter to be
sent out of Nigeria by a vessel not being a packet boat, nor to a letter concerning goods sent and to be
delivered with it, without any hire or reward being paid or received in respect thereof, or containing
process of, or proceedings or pleadings in, a court of justice, or briefs or cases, of instructions for
counsel and their opinions thereon, or containing a deed, affidavit, or power of attorney, nor to a letter
sent by a special messenger and concerning the private affairs of the sender, nor to a letter sent or
carried to or from the nearest post office:
Provided always that nothing in this section of this Code shall authorise any of the persons hereinafter
named to carry a letter, or to receive or collect or deliver a letter, although they shall not receive hire or
reward for the same‐
(a) common carriers, except a letter concerning goods which they are conveying;
(b) officers of the Nigerian Postal Service;
(c) owners, masters, or commanders of vessels being passage or packet boats, sailing and
passing between places in Nigeria with which postal communication has been
established, except in respect of letters concerning goods on board, or letters belonging
to the owners of such vessels;
(d) passengers, members of the crew, or other persons on board any such vessels as is
mentioned in paragraph (c) of this section;
(e) owners of, members of the crew, or others on board a vessel passing or repassing on a
river within Nigeria, except with respect to places in Nigeria with which postal
communication has not been established.

Section 177 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Illegally making of postal envelopes or setting up post office or office for sale of stamp, or
imitating post office

Any person who‐
[1966 No. 84. L.N. 112 of 1964.]
(1) without lawful authority or excuse, the proof of which lies on him‐
(a) makes any envelope, wrapper, card, form, or paper, in imitation of one issued by or under
the authority of the Postmaster‐General or of the postal authority of any other country, or
having thereon any word, letter, or mark, which signifies or implies, or may reasonably induce
a person receiving it to believe, that a letter, newspaper, packet, or parcel, bearing such word,
letter, or mark, is sent on State service, or on the public service of another country; or
(b) makes on any envelope, wrapper, card, form, or paper, in order to its being issued or
sent by post or otherwise, any stamp or mark in imitation of a stamp or mark of any
post office under the control of the Postmaster‐General or of the postal authority of any
other country, or any other stamp or mark, or any word or letter, which signifies or
implies, or may reasonably induce a person receiving it to believe, that a letter,
newspaper, packet, or parcel, bearing such stamp, mark, word, or letter, is sent on State
service, or on the public service of another country; or
(c) issues or sends by post or otherwise, any envelope, wrapper, card, form, or paper, so
marked; or
(2) without the authority of the Postmaster‐General, the proof of which lies on the person
charged, places or maintains, or permits to be placed or maintained, or to remain in, on, or near, any
place under his control‐
(i) the words “post office”; or
(ii) the words “letter box”, accompanied with words, letters or marks which signify or
imply, or may reasonably lead the public to believe, that it is a receptacle provided by
the authority of the Postmaster‐General for the reception of postal matter; or
(iii) any words, letters or marks which signify or imply, or may reasonably lead the public to
believe, that any place is a post office, or that any such receptacle is provided by the
authority of the Postmaster‐General as aforesaid; or
(3) without the authority of the Postmaster‐General, the proof of which lies on the person
charged, places, or permits to be placed or to remain, on any vehicle or vessel under his control the
words “royal mail”, or any word, letter or mark, which signifies or implies, or may reasonably induce any
person to believe, that the vehicle or vessel is used for the conveyance of mails; or
(4) without the licence of the Minister charged with responsibility for postal matters, the proof
of which lies on the person charged‐
(i) sells, or offers or exposes for sale, any postage stamp; or
(ii) places, permits to be placed or to remain, on or near to his house or premises the words
“licensed to sell stamps”, or any word, letter or mark, which signifies or implies, or may reasonably
induce any person to believe, that he is duly licensed to sell postage stamps,
is guilty of a simple offence and is liable to a fine of ten naira.

Section 178 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Destroying or damaging letter box

Any person who wilfully destroys or damages any receptacle provided by authority of the Postmaster‐
General for the receipt of postal matter, or any card or notice relating to the postal or telegraph service
set up by authority of the Postmaster‐General, or obliterates any letter or figure on any such thing, is
guilty of a simple offence and is liable to a fine of one hundred naira.
[1966 No. 84.]

Section 179 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Placing injurious substances in or against letter box

Any person who places in or against any receptacle provided by authority of the Postmaster‐General for
the reception of postal matter or telegrams, any fire or match, or any explosive, dangerous, noxious or
deleterious substance, or any fluid or filth, is guilty of a simple offence and is liable to a fine of forty
naira.
[1966 No. 84.]

Section 180 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Defacing post office or letter box

Any person who without the licence of the Postmaster‐General affixes, or attempts to affix, any placard,
advertisement, notice, list, document, board, or paint, tar, or other thing to any post office or telegraph
office, is guilty of a simple offence and is liable to a fine of ten naira.
[1966 No. 84.]

Section 181 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Obstructing post and telegraph offices

Any person who, by stopping or loitering opposite to or on the premises of a post office or telegraph
office, obstructs the business of the office or any other person lawfully going to the office, is guilty of a
simple offence and is liable to a fine of ten naira.

Section 182 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Obstructing post and telegraph officers in the execution of duty

Any person who‐
[1966 No. 84.]
(1) wilfully obstructs a person employed by or under the Nigerian Postal Service or any telegraph
official in the execution of the duties of his employment; or
(2) being in a post office or telegraph office, or within any premises appertaining to a post office
or telegraph office, or used therewith, wilfully obstructs the business of the office; or
(3) without the permission of a competent authority enters any part of a telegraph office to
which the public are not admitted,
is guilty of a simple offence and is liable to a fine of four naira.
Any person employed by or under the Nigerian Postal Service or any telegraph official may require any
person committing any of the offences defined in this section of this Code to leave the post office, or
telegraph office, or premises.
Any person who refuses or fails to comply with such request is guilty of a simple offence and is liable to
a further fine of ten naira, and may be removed by any person authorised to make the request; and all
members of the police force are required, on demand, to remove or assist in removing such person.

Section 183 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Any person who‐
(a) not being authorised by or under any Act so to do, establishes or maintains any
telegraph; or
(b) knowing or having reason to believe that a telegraph has been established or is
maintained without such authority as aforesaid, transmits or receives any message by
such telegraph or performs any service incidental thereto, or delivery of any message
for transmission by such telegraph or accepts delivery of any message sent thereby,
is guilty of a simple offence and is liable on a first conviction to a fine of twenty naira, and on every
subsequent conviction to a fine of one hundred naira.

Section 184-185 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 184-185 has been Deleted by 1975 No. 30

Section 186 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Negligently injuring telegraphs

Any person who negligently destroys or damages any telegraph works, is guilty of a simple offence and
is liable to a fine of four naira.

Section 187 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Violation of secrecy

Any telegraph official who, contrary to his duty, publishes or communicates the contents or substance of
a telegram, or any information relating to the despatch or receipt of any telegram, except to some
person to whom he is authorised to deliver the telegram, is guilty of a felony and is liable to
imprisonment for three years.

Section 188 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Resisting officers

Any person who resists a person employed by or under the Nigerian Postal Service while engaged in the
execution of his duty under the laws relating to posts and telegraphs, is guilty of a simple offence and is
liable to imprisonment for three months, or to a fine of forty naira.
[1966 No. 84.]

Section 189 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Laying property in postal matter and telegraph works

(1) In case of any offence under this Code in respect of any postal matter bag or postal matter,
or of any chattel, money, or valuable security sent by post, it shall be sufficient in any proceedings to lay
the ownership in the Postmaster‐General.
[1966 No. 84.]
(2) In case of any offence under this Code in respect of any telegram, telegraph line or telegraph
works, established under the provisions of the Wireless Telegraphs Act, or the Telegraphs Proclamation,
or in respect of any form, paper, book, or other thing used for the purpose of carrying out the provisions
of such Act or proclamation, it shall be sufficient in any proceedings to lay the ownership in the
Postmaster‐General.
[Cap. W5.]
(3) In any such proceedings as aforesaid, it shall not be necessary to prove ownership, or to
allege or prove any value.


Credit: https://lawsofnigeria.placng.org/laws/C38.pdf

Section 161-175 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 161-175 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 161 to 189 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act is under Chapter 17 (Offences relating to Posts and Telecommunications) of the Act.

Section 161 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Stopping mails

Any person who stops a mail with intent to search or rob postal matter is guilty of a felony and is liable
to imprisonment for life.

Section 162 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Intercepting telegrams or postal matter

Any person who unlawfully secretes or destroys any postal matter or telegram or any part of any such
thing, is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for seven years, and if any such postal matter so
secreted or destroyed shall contain any money or chattel whatsoever, or any valuable security, such
person is liable to imprisonment for life.

Section 163 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Tampering with telegrams or postal matter

Any person who, being employed by or under the Nigerian Postal Service, does with respect to any
postal matter or telegram any act which he is not authorised to do by virtue of his employment, or
knowingly permits any other person to do any such act with respect to any such thing, is guilty of a
felony and is liable to imprisonment for three years.
[1966 No. 84.]

Section 164 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Wilful misdelivery of telegrams or postal matter

Any person who, being charged by virtue of his employment or by virtue of any contract, with the
delivery of any postal matter or telegram, wilfully delivers it to a person other than the person to whom
it is addressed, or his authorised agent in that behalf, is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment
for three years.

Section 165 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Obtaining telegrams or postal matter by false pretences

Any person who by means of any false pretence induces any person employed by or under the Nigerian
Postal Service or any telegraph official to deliver to him any postal matter or telegram which is not
addressed to him, is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for two years.
[1966 No. 84.]

Section 166 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Secreting letters and telegrams

Any person who wilfully secretes or detains any postal matter or telegram which is found by him, or
which is wrongly delivered to him, and which, in either case, ought to his knowledge, to have been
delivered to another person, is guilty of a misdemeanor and is liable to imprisonment for two years.

Section 167 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Fraudulent issue of money orders and postal orders

Any person who, being employed by or under the Nigerian Postal Service, and being charged by virtue of
his employment with any duty in connection with the issue of money orders or postal orders, unlawfully,
and with intent to defraud, issues a money order or postal order, is guilty of a felony, and is liable to
imprisonment for seven years.
[1966 No. 84.]

Section 168 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Fraudulent messages respecting money orders

Any person who, being employed by or under the Nigerian Postal Service, and being charged by virtue of
his employment with any duty in connection with money orders, sends to any other person, with intent
to defraud, any false or misleading letter, telegram, or message concerning a money order, or
concerning any money payable under a money order, is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment
for three years.
[1966 No.84.]
The offender cannot be arrested without warrant.

Section 169 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Unlawful franking of letters

Any person who, being empowered under the provisions of any enactment or authorised by the
Minister charged with responsibility for postal matter to frank postal matter, superscribes any postal
matter‐
[L.N. 112 of 1964.]
(a) which does not relate to the business of his office or department; or
(b) into which there has been inserted any letter or other thing which does not relate to
such business,
with intent to avoid payment of the postage on such postal matter or other letter or thing inserted as
aforesaid into such postal matter, is guilty of an offence, and is liable to a fine of two hundred naira.

Section 170 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Sending dangerous or obscene things by post

Any person who knowingly sends, or attempts to send by post anything which‐
(a) encloses anything, whether living or inanimate, of such a nature as to be likely to injure
any other thing in the course of conveyance or to injure any person; or
(b) encloses an indecent or obscene print, painting, photograph, lithograph, engraving,
book, card, or article, or which has on it, or in it, or on its cover, any indecent, obscene,
or grossly offensive words, marks, or designs,
is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for one year.

Section 171 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Retarding delivery of telegrams or postal matter

Any person who, being required by law or by virtue of his employment to do any act with respect to the
receipt, despatch, or delivery, of any postal matter or telegram‐
[L.N. 112 of 1964.]
(a) neglects or refuses to do such act; or
(b) wilfully detains or delays, or permits the detention or delay of any such thing; or
(c) opens, or procures or suffers to be opened, any postal matter,
is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to a fine of two hundred naira or to imprisonment for one year:
Provided always that nothing herein contained shall extend to the opening or detaining of any postal
matter or telegram returned by reason that the person to whom the same shall be directed is dead, or
cannot be found, or shall have refused the same, or shall have refused or neglected to pay the postage
thereof or any charges payable in respect thereof, nor to the opening or detaining or delaying of any
postal matter or telegram under the authority of any Act or in obedience to an express warrant in
writing under the hand of the Minister charged with responsibility for postal matter.

Section 172 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Obstructing mails

Any person who wilfully obstructs or delays the conveyance or delivery of postal matter, is guilty of a
simple offence and is liable to a fine of one hundred naira.

Section 173 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Penalty on loitering, carelessness in delivery of mails, etc.

(1) Any person who, being employed by or under the Nigerian Postal Service to conveyor deliver
postal matter whilst so employed‐
(a) allows any postal matter bag or postal matter out of his possession; or
(b) suffers any unauthorised person to interfere with any such postal matter bag or postal
matter; or
(c) is guilty of any neglect whereby any such postal matter bag or postal matter is
endangered; or
(d) loiters on the road; or
(e) wilfully misspends or loses time; or
(f) is under the influence of intoxicating liquor; or
(g) does not convey postal matter at the speed fixed by the Postmaster‐General for the
conveyance thereof, unless prevented by some cause beyond his control, the proof, whereof lies on the
person charged,
is guilty of a simple offence and is liable to a fine of twenty naira.
(2) Any person who, being employed by or under the Nigerian Postal Service, negligently loses
any postal mater or telegram or negligently detains or delays, or permits the detention or delay of, any
postal matter or telegram, is guilty of a simple offence and is liable to a fine of twenty naira.

Section 174 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Fraudulently removing stamps

Any person who, with intent to defraud‐
(1) removes from any postal matter or telegram any stamp affixed thereon; or
(2) removes from any stamp previously used any mark thereon at a postal or telegraph office; or
(3) knowingly uses a postage stamp which has been obliterated or defaced by a mark made
thereon at a post or telegraph office; or
(4) knowingly tampers with a postage stamp by smearing or coating the surface with mucilage
or any other substance so that it may be used again at a post or telegraph office,
is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for one year or to a fine of one hundred naira.
On the trial of a person charged with the offence of knowingly using a postage stamp which has been
obliterated or defaced by a mark made thereon at a post office, proof that the person charged is the
writer of the address of anything sent by post on which the stamp is affixed is sufficient evidence that he
is the person who used the stamp, until the contrary is shown.

Section 175 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Fraudulent evasion of postal laws

Any person who‐
(1) knowingly and fraudulently puts into a post office anything in or upon which, or in or upon
the cover of which there is any letter, newspaper, or other thing, or any writing or mark, not allowed by
law to be there placed; or
(2) wilfully subscribes on the outside of anything sent by post a false statement of its contents;
or
(3) knowingly and fraudulently puts into a post office anything which falsely purports to be a
thing falling within any exemption or privilege declared by the laws relating to postal matter,
is guilty of a simple offence and is liable to a fine of one hundred naira.


Credit: https://lawsofnigeria.placng.org/laws/C38.pdf

Section 146-160B of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 146-160B of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 146-160B of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act is under Chapter 16 (Offences relating to the Currency) of the Act.

Section 146 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Interpretation

In this Chapter, unless the context otherwise requires‐
“counterfeit” applied to coin, means coin not genuine but resembling or apparently intended to
resemble or pass for genuine coin, and includes genuine coin which has been prepared or altered so as
to resemble or be apparently intended to resemble or pass for a coin of a higher denomination, or
where the coin is that of a foreign sovereign or state, current coin, and also genuine coin which has been
clipped or filed, or the size or weight of which has been otherwise diminished, and which has been
prepared or altered so as to conceal such clipping, filing, or diminution: it includes any such coin
whether it is or is not in a fit state to be uttered, and whether the process of preparation or alteration is
or is not complete;
“current” applied to coins, means any coin of the coins or denominations coined for and lawfully current
in Nigeria, and includes any other coin lawfully current in any other country;
“gold” and “silver” applied to coin, includes producing the appearance of gold or silver respectively by
any means whatever;
“metal” includes any mixture or alloy of metals;
“nickel coin” includes any coin made of metal of a less value than the silver or alloy of silver used in the
silver coin of the country in question, save that it does not include any of the coins of mixed metal
current in Nigeria by virtue of any Act or the provisions of the Coins Act;
[Cap. C16.]
“silver coin” (except where it is used in the definition of “nickel coin”) includes any of the coins of mixed
metal current in Nigeria by virtue of any Act or the provisions of the Coins Act; and
“utter” includes using, dealing with, or acting upon, and attempting to use, deal with, or act upon, and
attempting to induce any person to use, deal with, or act upon the thing in question as if it were
genuine.

Section 147 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Counterfeiting gold and silver coin

(1) Any person who makes or begins to make any counterfeit current gold or silver coin is guilty
of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for life.
(2) Where a person has ten or more unfinished counterfeit coins in his possession the court may
presume that he has made them or has been a participant in the act of making them unless he proves
the contrary.

Section 148 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Preparation for coining gold and silver coin

Any person who‐
(1) gilds or silvers any piece of metal of a fit size or figure to be coined, with intent that it shall
be coined into counterfeit gold or silver coin; or
(2) makes any piece of metal into a fit size or figure to facilitate the coining from it of any
counterfeit gold or silver coin, with intent that such counterfeit coin shall be made from it; or
(3) without lawful authority or excuse, the proof of which lies on him‐
(a) buys, sells, receives, pays, or disposes of, any counterfeit gold or silver coin at a lower
rate than it imports or is apparently intended to import, or offers to do any such thing;
or
(b) makes or mends, or begins or prepares to make or mend, or has in his possession, or
disposes of, any stamp or mould which is adapted to make the resemblance of both or
either of the sides of any gold or silver coin, or any part of either side thereof, knowing
the same to be such a stamp or mould or to be so adapted; or
(c) makes or mends, or begins or prepares to make or mend, or has in his possession, or
disposes of, any tool, instrument, or machine, which is adapted and intended to be used
for marking coin round the edges with marks or figures apparently resembling those on
the edges of any gold or silver coin, knowing the same to be so adapted and intended;
or
(d) makes or mends, or begins or prepares to make or mend, or has in his possession, or
disposes of, any press for coinage, or any tool, instrument, or machine, which is adapted
for cutting round blanks out of gold, silver, or other metal, knowing such press, tool,
instrument, or machine to have been used or to be intended to be used for making any
counterfeit gold or silver coin; or
(e) knowingly conveys out of any mint within the Commonwealth any stamp, mould, tool,
instrument, machine, or press, used or employed in coining, or any useful part of any of
such thing, or any coin, bullion, or metal,
is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for life.

Section 148A of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Unlawful inquiries with the object of making counterfeit coins

(1) Any person who without authority or excuse, the proof whereof lies on him, either orally or
in writing makes any inquiry of any other person whether such last‐mentioned person be in Nigeria or at
any place not in Nigeria‐
(a) as to obtaining or supplying or as to the cost of obtaining or supplying any machine,
stamp, tool, instrument, metal or material which is adapted or is intended to be used‐
(i) to make the resemblance of both or either sides of any current coin or any part
of either side thereof; or
(ii) to mark any coin or disc resembling coin or intended to resemble coin round the
edges with marks, figures or letters apparently resembling those on the edges of
any current coin; or
(iii) to cut round blanks out of metal or other substance,
knowing such machine, stamp, tool, instrument, metal or material to have been adapted or intended to
be used for making any counterfeit coin or for performing any process in the manufacture of counterfeit
coin; or
(a) as to making, obtaining or supplying or as to the cost of making, obtaining or supplying any
counterfeit coin,
is guilty of an offence and liable to imprisonment for one year.
(2) In the case of written inquiries in connection with any of the matters or subjects to which
subsection (1) of this section relates, the fact that such inquiries were reduced into writing shall be
sufficient proof of an attempt to commit the offence and the offender shall be subject to a like penalty
as if he had committed the offence.

Section 149 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Clipping

Any person who deals with any current gold or silver coin in such a manner as to diminish its weight with
intent that when so dealt with it may pass as current gold or silver coin, is guilty of a felony and is liable
to imprisonment for life.

Section 150 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Possession of clippings

Any person who unlawfully has in his possession or disposes of any filings, or clippings of gold or silver,
or any gold or silver in bullion, dust, solution, or any other state, obtained by dealing with current gold
or silver coin in such a manner as to diminish its weight, knowing the same to have been so obtained, is
guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for seven years.

Section 151 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Uttering counterfeit current gold or silver coin

Any person who utters any counterfeit current gold or silver coin knowing it to be counterfeit, is guilty of
a misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for two years.
A person found committing the offence may be arrested without warrant.

Section 152 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Repeated uttering of counterfeit current gold or silver coin, or possession of several such coins

(1) Any person who‐
(a) utters any counterfeit gold or silver coin, knowing it to be counterfeit, and at the time of
such uttering has in his possession any other counterfeit gold or silver coin; or
(b) utters any counterfeit gold or silver coin, knowing it to be counterfeit, and either on the
same day or on any of the ten days next ensuing, utters any other counterfeit current
gold or silver coin, knowing it to be counterfeit; or
(c) has in his possession three or more pieces of counterfeit current gold or silver coin,
knowing them to be counterfeit, and with intent to utter any of them,
is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for ten years.
(2) Where a person has ten or more counterfeit coins in his possession, the court may presume
an intent to utter unless he proves the contrary.

Section 153 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Offences after previous conviction

Any person who commits any of the offences defined in sections 151 and 152 of this Code, after having
been previously convicted of any of those offences committed with respect to current coin, or of any
felony committed with respect to current coin, is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for life.

Section 154 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Counterfeiting nickel coin

Any person who‐
(a) makes, or begins to make, any counterfeit current nickel coin; or
(b) without lawful authority or excuse, the proof of which lies on him, knowingly makes or
mends, or begins, or prepares to make or mend, or has in his possession, or disposes of,
any tool, instrument, or machine, which is adapted and intended for making any
counterfeit current nickel coin; or
(c) buys, sells, receives, pays, or disposes of, any counterfeit current nickel coin at a lower
rate of value than it imports, or was apparently intended to import, or offers to do any
such act,
is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for seven years.
A person found committing the offence may be arrested without warrant.

Section 155 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Uttering base nickel coin

(1) Any person who‐
(a) utters any counterfeit current nickel coin, knowing it to be counterfeit; or
(b) has in his possession three or more pieces of counterfeit current nickel coin, knowing
them to be counterfeit, and with intent to utter any of them,
is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for one year.
A person found committing the offence may be arrested without warrant.
(2) Where a person has ten or more counterfeit coins in his possession, the court may presume
an intent to utter unless he proves the contrary.

Section 156 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Defacing coin by stamping words thereon

Any person who defaces any current coin by stamping thereon any name or word, whether the weight
of the coin is or is not thereby diminished, is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for
one year.
A person found committing the offence may be arrested without warrant.

Section 157 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Uttering foreign coin, medals, etc., as current coin with intent to defraud

Any person who, with intent to defraud, utters as and for current gold or silver coin‐
(a) any coin which is not current coin; or
(b) any metal or pieces of metal, whether a coin or not, which is of less value than the
current coin as and for which it is uttered,
is guilty of a misdemeanour, and is liable to imprisonment for one year.
A person found committing the offence may be arrested without warrant.

Section 158 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Exporting counterfeit current coin

Any person who, without lawful authority or excuse, the proof of which lies on him, exports or puts on
board of a vessel or vehicle of any kind for the purpose of being exported from Nigeria, any counterfeit
current coin whatever, knowing it to be counterfeit, is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for
fourteen years.
A person found committing the offence may be arrested without warrant.

Section 159 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Unlawfully importing counterfeit coin

Any person who without lawful authority or excuse, the proof of which lies on him, imports or receives
into Nigeria any counterfeit coin whatever, knowing it to be counterfeit, is guilty of a felony and is liable
to imprisonment for fourteen years.
A person found committing the offence may be arrested without warrant.

Section 160 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Tender of defaced coin not legal tender: penalty for uttering

Any person who utters any current coin which is defaced by the stamping of any name or word thereon,
is guilty of an offence and is liable to a fine of four naira.
A prosecution for any such offence cannot be commenced without the consent of a law officer. A tender
of payment in money made in any coin so defaced is not a legal tender.

Section 160A of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Making, issue and circulation of promissory notes payable to bearer on demand, without
authority

Any person, other than the Central Bank of Nigeria, who makes or issues within Nigeria promissory
notes payable to bearer on demand or circulates within Nigeria any promissory note
payable to bearer on demand, is guilty of a misdemeanour and liable on conviction to a fine equal to
double the value of any promissory note unlawfully made, issued or circulated or to imprisonment for a
term of twelve months, or to both such imprisonment and fine.
[L.N. 112 of 1964.]

Section 160B of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Portrayal of Nigerian notes and coins

Any person who, without the written permission of the Minister of the Federation charged with
responsibility for matters relating to finance, makes or sells, or exposes or offers for sale, or uses for the
purpose of advertising any material or document on or in which is portrayed a note or coin in any way
resembling a currency note, bank note or coin current in Nigeria, is guilty of a misdemeanour and is
liable to imprisonment for one year or to a fine of two hundred naira.
[49 of 1960.]


Credit: https://lawsofnigeria.placng.org/laws/C38.pdf

Section 134-145 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 134-145 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 134 to 145 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act is under Chapter 15 (Escapes; Rescues; obstructing officers of court) of the Act.

Section 134 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Rescue

(1) Any person who by force rescues or attempts to rescue from lawful custody any other
person‐
(a) is, if the last‐named person is under a sentence of death or penal servitude or
imprisonment for life, or charged with an offence punishable with death, or penal
servitude or imprisonment for life, guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for
life; and
(b) is, in any other case, guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for seven years.
(2) If the person rescued is in the custody of a private person, the offender must have notice of
the fact that the person rescued is in such custody.

Section 135 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Escape

Any person who, being in lawful custody, escapes from such custody‐
(a) is, if he is charged with, or has been convicted of a felony or misdemeanour, guilty of a
felony and is liable to imprisonment for seven years, with or without whipping; and
(b) is, in any other case, guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for two
years.

Section 136 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Aiding prisoners to escape

Any person who‐
(1) aids a prisoner in escaping or attempting to escape from lawful custody; or
(2) conveys anything or causes anything to be conveyed into a prison with intent to facilitate the
escape of a prisoner,
is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for seven years.

Section 137 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Permitting escape

Any person who, being an officer of a prison, or a member of a police force, wilfully permits any other
person within his lawful custody to escape‐
(a) is, if such last‐named person is charged with an offence punishable by death, or penal
servitude or imprisonment for life, guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for seven years; and
(b) is, in any other case, guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for three years.

Section 138 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Negligently permitting escape

Any person who, being an officer of a prison, or a member of a police force, negligently permits a person
within his lawful custody to escape, is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for two
years.

Section 139 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Prison officers accessory to breaches of discipline

If any prison officer or person in charge of any convicted prisoner knowingly permits or suffers such
prisoner to receive any tobacco, food, money, or other article, or to enter any house, yard, or premises
not being the place appointed for the labour of such prisoner he is guilty of a misdemeanour and is
liable to imprisonment for six months and to a fine of one hundred naira.

Section 140-142 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 140-142 has been (Repealed by 1972 No.9).

Section 143 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Rescuing insane persons

Any person who‐
(a) rescues any person during his conveyance as an insane person to a hospital, lunatic
asylum, or a reception house for the insane or to a house licensed under the laws
relating to insane persons for the reception of patients, or to a prison, rescues any
person during his confinement as an insane person in any such place; or
(b) being in charge of a person during his conveyance as an insane person to any such place,
wilfully permits him to escape from custody; or
(c) being a superintendent of, or person employed in any such place, wilfully permits a
person confined therein as an insane person to escape therefrom; or
(d) conceals any such person as aforesaid, who has, to his knowledge, been rescued during
such conveyance or confinement, or has, to his knowledge, escaped during such
conveyance, or from such confinement,
is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for three years.
The offender cannot be arrested without warrant.

Section 144 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Removing, etc., property under lawful seizure

Any person who, when any property has been attached or taken under the process or authority of any
court, knowingly, and with intent to hinder or defeat the attachment or process, receives, removes,
retains, conceals, or disposes of such property, is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for
three years.

Section 145 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Obstructing officers of courts of justice

Any person who wilfully obstructs or resists any person lawfully charged with the execution of an order
or warrant of any court, is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for one year or to a
fine of two hundred naira.


Credit: https://lawsofnigeria.placng.org/laws/C38.pdf

Section 112-133 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 112-133 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 112-133 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act is under Chapter 13 (Selling and Trafficking in offices) and Chapter 14 (Offences relating to the administration of justice) of the Act.

Section 112 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Bargaining for offices in public service

Any person who‐
(1) corruptly asks, receives, or obtains, or agrees or attempts to receive or obtain, any property or
benefit of any kind for himself or any other person on account of anything already done or omitted to be
done, or to be afterwards done or omitted to be done, by him or any other person, with regard to the
appointment or contemplated appointment of any person to any office or employment in the public
service, or with regard to any application by any person for employment in the public service; or
(2) corruptly gives, confers, or procures, or promises or offers to give or confer, or to procure or attempt
to procure, to, upon, or for, any person any property or benefit of any kind on account of any such act or
omission,
is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for three years.
The offender cannot be arrested without warrant.

Chapter 14 – (Offences relating to the administration of justice)

Section 113 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Definition of judicial proceeding

In this Chapter, the term “judicial proceeding” includes any proceeding had or taken in or before any
court, tribunal, commission of inquiry, or person, in which evidence mayor may not be taken on oath.

Section 114-116 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 114-116 has been Deleted by 1966 No. 84

Section 117 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Perjury

Any person who, in any judicial proceeding, or for the purpose of instituting any judicial proceeding,
knowingly gives false testimony touching any matter which is material to any question then pending in
that proceedings, or intended to be raised in that proceeding, is guilty of an offence which is called
perjury,
It is immaterial whether the testimony is given on oath or under any other sanction authorised by law.
The forms and ceremonies used in administering the oath or in otherwise binding the person giving the
testimony to speak the truth are immaterial, if he assent to the forms and ceremonies actually used.
It is immaterial whether the false testimony is given orally or in writing.
It is immaterial whether the court or tribunal is properly constituted, or is held in the proper place, or
not, if it actually acts as a court or tribunal in the proceeding in which the testimony is given.
It is immaterial whether the person who gives the testimony is a competent witness or not, or whether
the testimony is admissible in the proceeding or not.
The offender cannot be arrested without warrant.

Section 118 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Punishment of perjury

Any person who commits perjury is liable to imprisonment for fourteen years.
If the offender commits the offence in order to procure the conviction of another person for an offence
punishable with death or with imprisonment for life he is liable to imprisonment for life.

Section 119 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Evidence on charge of perjury

A person cannot be convicted of committing perjury, or of counselling or procuring the commission of
perjury, upon the uncorroborated testimony of one witness.

Section 120 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Fabricating evidence

Any person who, with intent to mislead any tribunal in any judicial proceeding‐
(1) fabricates evidence by any means other than perjury or counselling or procuring the
commission of perjury; or
(2) knowingly makes use of such fabricated evidence,
is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for seven years.
The offender cannot be arrested without warrant.

Section 121 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Corruption of witnesses

Any person who‐
(1) gives, confers, or procures, or promises or offers to give or confer, or to procure or attempt
to procure, any property or benefit of any kind to, upon, or for, any person, upon any agreement or
understanding that any person called or to be called as a witness in any judicial proceeding shall give
false testimony or withhold true testimony; or
(2) attempts by any other means to induce a person called or to be called as a witness in any
judicial proceeding to give false testimony or to withhold true testimony; or
(3) asks, receives or obtains, or agrees or attempts to receive or obtain any property or benefit of any
kind for himself or any other person, upon any agreement or understanding that any person shall as a
witness in any judicial proceeding give false testimony or withhold true testimony,
is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for seven years.
The offender cannot be arrested without warrant.

Section 122 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Deceiving witnesses

Any person who practises any fraud or deceit, or knowingly makes or exhibits any false statement,
representation, token, or writing, to any person called or to be called as a witness in any judicial
proceeding, with intent to affect the testimony of such person as a witness, is guilty of a felony and is
liable to imprisonment for three years.
The offender cannot be arrested without warrant.

Section 123 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Destroying evidence

Any person who, knowing that any book, document, or other thing of any kind, is or may be required in
evidence in a judicial proceeding, wilfully removes, conceals or destroys it or renders it illegible or
undecipherable or incapable of identification, with intent thereby to prevent it from being used in
evidence, is guilty of a felony, and is liable to imprisonment for three years.
The offender cannot be arrested without warrant.

Section 124 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Preventing witnesses from attending

Any person who wilfully prevents or attempts to prevent any person who has been duly summoned to
attend as a witness before any court or tribunal from attending as a witness or from producing anything
in evidence pursuant to the subpoena or summons, is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to
imprisonment for one year.

Section 125 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Conspiracy to bring false accusation

Any person who conspires with another to charge any person or cause any person to be charged with
any offence, whether alleged to have been committed in Nigeria or elsewhere, knowing that such
person is innocent of the alleged offence or not believing him to be guilty of the alleged offence, is guilty
of a felony.
If the offence is such that a person convicted of it is liable to be sentenced to death or to imprisonment
for life, the offender is liable to imprisonment for life.
If the offence is such that a person convicted of it is liable to be sentenced to imprisonment, but for a
term less than life, the offender is liable to imprisonment for fourteen years.
In any other case the offender is liable to imprisonment for seven years. The offender cannot be
arrested without warrant.

Section 125A of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Making false statement to public officers with intent

(1) Any individual who gives any information which he knows or believes to be false to any
person employed in the public service with the intention of causing such person‐
(a) to do or omit to do anything which such person ought not to do or ought not to omit to
do if the true facts concerning the information given were known to such person; or
(b) to exercise or use his lawful powers as a person employed in the public service to the
injury or annoyance of any other person,
is guilty of an offence and liable to imprisonment for one year.
(2) A prosecution for an offence under this section of this Code shall not be instituted‐
(a) without the consent of a superior police officer; or
(b) where in any division an administrative officer has been duly appointed to have charge
of the police therein under the provisions of subsection (1) of section 7 of the Police Act,
[Cap. P19.]
without the consent of that administrative officer.

Section 126 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Perverting justice

(1) Any person who conspires with another to obstruct, prevent, pervert, or defeat the course of
justice is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for seven years.
The offender cannot be arrested without warrant.
(2) Any person who attempts, in any way not specially defined in this Code, to obstruct, prevent,
pervert, or defeat, the course of justice, is guilty of a misdemeanor and is liable to imprisonment for two
years.

Section 127 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Compounding felonies

Any person who asks, receives, or obtains, or agrees or attempts to receive or obtain any property or
benefit of any kind for himself or any other person upon any agreement or understanding that he will
compound or conceal a felony, or will abstain from, discontinue, or delay a prosecution for a felony, or
will withhold any evidence thereof, is guilty of an offence.
If the felony is such that a person convicted of it is liable to be sentenced to death or imprisonment for
life, the offender is guilty of a felony, and is liable to imprisonment for seven years.
In any other case the offender is liable to imprisonment for three years. The offender cannot be arrested
without warrant.

Section 128 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Compounding penal actions

Any person who, having brought, or under pretence of bringing an action against another person upon a
penal Act, law or statute in order to obtain from him a penalty for any offence committed or alleged to
have been committed by him, compounds the action without the order or consent of the court in which
the action is brought or is to be brought, is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for
one year.

Section 129 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Advertising a reward for the return of stolen or lost property

Any person who‐
(1) publicly offers a reward for the return of any property which has been stolen or lost, and in
the offer makes use of any words purporting that no question will be asked, or that the person
producing such property will not be seized or molested; or
(2) publicly offers to return to any person who may have bought or advanced money by way of
loan upon any stolen or lost property the money so paid or advanced, or any other sum of money or
reward for the return of such property; or
(3) prints or publishes any such offer,
is guilty of a simple offence and is liable to a fine of one hundred naira.

Section 130 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Delay to take person arrested before a court

Any person who, having arrested another upon a charge of an offence, wilfully delays to take him before
a court to be dealt with according to law, is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for
two years.

Section 131 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Bringing fictitious action on penal Act, law or statute

Any person who, in the name of a fictitious plaintiff, or in the name of a real person but without his
authority, brings an action against another person upon a penal Act, law or statute for the recovery of a
penalty for any offence committed or alleged to have been committed by him, is guilty of a
misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for two years.

Section 132 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Inserting advertisement without authority of court

Any person who, without authority, or knowing the advertisement to be false in any material particular
inserts or causes it to be inserted in the Federal Gazette, or a State Gazette, or in any newspaper an
advertisement purporting to be published under the authority of any court or tribunal, is guilty of a
misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for two years.

Section 133 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Contempt of court

Any person who-
1) within the premises in which any judicial proceeding is being had or taken, or within the
precincts of the same, shows disrespect, in speech, or manner, to or with reference to such proceeding,
or any person before whom such proceeding is being had or taken; or
(2) having been called upon to give evidence in a judicial proceeding, fails to attend or, having
attended, refuses to be sworn or to make an affirmation, or, having been sworn or affirmed, refuses
without lawful excuse to answer a question, or to produce a document, or prevaricates, or remains in
the room in which such proceeding is being had or taken, after the witnesses have been ordered to
leave such room; or
(3) causes an obstruction or disturbance in the course of a judicial proceeding; or
(4) while a judicial proceeding is pending, makes use of any speech or writing, misrepresenting
such proceeding, or capable of prejudicing any person in favour of or against any party to such
proceeding, or calculated to lower the authority of any person before whom such proceeding is being
had or taken; or
(5) publishes a report of the evidence taken in any judicial proceeding which has been directed
to be held in private; or
(6) attempts wrongfully to interfere with or influence a witness in a judicial proceeding, either
before or after he has given evidence, in connection with such evidence; or
(7) dismisses a servant because he has given evidence on behalf of a certain party to a judicial
proceeding; or
(8) re‐takes possession of land from any person who has recently obtained possession by a writ
of court; or
(9) commits any other act of intentional disrespect to any judicial proceeding, or to any person
before whom such proceeding is being had or taken,
is guilty of a simple offence and liable to imprisonment for three months.


Credit: https://lawsofnigeria.placng.org/laws/C38.pdf

Section 89-111 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 89-111 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 89 to 111 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act is under Chapter 11(Disclosure of official secrets and abstracting document) and Chapter 12 (Corruption and abuse of office) of the Act.

Section 89 to 96 of the Nigerian Code Act

Section 89 to 96 of the Nigerian Code Act has been Deleted by No.31 of 1941.

Section 97 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Disclosure of official secrets

(1) Any person who, being employed in the public service, publishes or communicates any fact
which comes to his knowledge by virtue of his office, and which it is his duty to keep secret, or any
document which comes to his possession by virtue of his office and which it is his duty to keep secret,
except to some person to whom he is bound to publish or communicate it, is guilty of a misdemeanour,
and is liable to imprisonment for two years.
Public servant abstracting, etc., documents
(2) Any person who, being employed in the public service, without proper authority abstracts, or
makes a copy of, any document the property of his employer is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to
imprisonment for one year.

Restriction on prosecutions
(3) A prosecution for an offence under the provisions of this section of this Code shall not be
commenced except by, or with the consent of, a law officer.

Chapter 12 – Corruption and abuse of office

Section 98 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Official corruption: public official inviting bribes, etc., on account of own actions

(1) Any public official (as defined in section 98D) who‐
(a) corruptly asks for, receives or obtains any property or benefit of any kind for himself or
any other person; or
[1966 No. 84.]
(b) corruptly agrees or attempts to receive or obtain any property or benefit of any kind for
himself or any other person, on account of‐
(i) anything already done or omitted, or any favour or disfavour already shown to
any person, by himself in the discharge of his official duties or in relation to any
matter connected with the functions, affairs or business of a government
department, public body or other organisation or institution in which he is
serving as a public official; or
(ii) anything to be afterwards done or omitted, or any favour; or disfavour to be
afterwards shown to any person, by himself in the discharge of his official duties
or in relation to any such matter as aforesaid,
is guilty of the felony of official corruption and is liable to imprisonment for seven years.
(2) If in any proceedings for an offence under this section of this Code it is proved that any
property or benefit of any kind, or any promise thereof, was received by a public official, or by some
other person at the instance of a public official, from a person‐
(a) holding, or seeking to obtain, a contract, licence or permit from a government
department, public body or other organisation or institution in which that public official
is serving as such; or
(b) concerned, or likely to be concerned, in any proceeding or business transacted, pending
or likely to be transacted before or by that public official or a government department,
public body or other organisation or institution in which that public official is serving as
such,
or by or from any person acting on behalf of or related to such a person, the property, benefit or
promise shall, unless the contrary is proved, be deemed to have been received corruptly on account of
such a past or future act, omission, favour or disfavour as is mentioned in subsection (1) (i) or (ii) of this
section.
(3) In any proceedings for an offence under this section to which subsection (1) (ii) of this
section is relevant it shall not be a defence to show that the accused‐
(a) did not subsequently do, make or show the act, omission, favour or disfavour in
question; or
(b) never intended to do, make or show it.
(4) Without prejudice to subsection (3) of this section, where a police officer or other public
official whose official duties include the prosecution, detention or punishment of offenders, is charged
with an offence under this section of this Code in connection with‐
(a) the arrest, detention or prosecution of any person for an alleged offence; or
(b) an omission to arrest, detain or prosecute any person for an alleged offence; or
(c) the investigation of an alleged offence,
it shall not be necessary to prove that the accused believed that the offence mentioned in paragraph (a),
(b) or (c) of subsection (4) of this section, or any other offence, had been committed.

Section 98A of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Official corruption: person giving bribes, etc., on account of actions of public official

(1) Any person who‐
[1966 No. 84.]
(a) corruptly gives, confers or procures any property or benefit of any kind to, on or for a
public official (as defined in section 98D) or to, on or for any other person; or
(b) corruptly promises or offers to give or confer or to procure or attempt to procure any
property or benefit of any kind to, on or for a public official or to, on or for any other
person,
on account of any such act, omission, favour or disfavour on the part of the public official as is
mentioned in section 98 (1) (i) or (ii) of this Code, is guilty of the felony of official corruption and is liable
to imprisonment for seven years.

(2) If in any proceedings for an offence under this section of this Code it is proved that any
property or benefit of any kind, or any promise thereof, was given to a public official, or to some other
person at the instance of a public official, by a person‐
(a) holding, or seeking to obtain, a contract, licence or permit from a government
department, public body or other organisation or institution in which that public official
is serving as such; or
(b) concerned, or likely to be concerned, in any proceeding or business transacted, pending
or likely to be transacted before or by that public official or a government department,
public body or other organisation or institution in which that public official is serving as
such,
or by or from any person acting on behalf of or related to such a person, the property, benefit, or
promise shall, unless the contrary is proved, be deemed to have been given corruptly on account of such
a past or future act, omission, favour or disfavour as is mentioned in section 98 (1) (i) or (ii) of this Code.

Section 98B of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Official corruption: person inviting bribes, etc., on account of actions of public official

(1) Any person who‐
[1966 No. 84.]
(a) corruptly asks for, receives or obtains any property or benefit of any kind for himself or
any other person; or
(b) corruptly agrees or attempts to receive or obtain any property or benefit of any kind for
himself or any other person,
on account of‐
(i) anything already done or omitted, or any favour or disfavour already shown to any
person, by a public official (as defined in section 98D of this Code) in the discharge of his
official duties or in relation to any matter connected with the functions, affairs or business
of a government department, public body or other organisation or institution in which the
public official is serving as such; or
(ii) anything to be afterwards done or omitted, or any favour or disfavour to be afterwards
shown to any person, by a public official in the discharge of his official duties or in relation
to any such matter as aforesaid,
is guilty of the felony of official corruption and is liable to imprisonment for seven years.
(2) In any proceedings for an offence under this section of this Code it shall not be necessary to
prove‐
(a) that any public official counselled the commission of the offence; or
(b) that in the course of committing the offence the accused mentioned any particular
public official; or
(c) that (in a case to which subsection (1) (ii) of this section is relevant) the accused
believed
that any public official would do, make or show the act, omission, favour or disfavour in
question; or
(d) that the accused intended to give the property or benefit in question, or any part
thereof, to a public official.

Section 98C of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Restrictions on arrest and prosecution of judicial officers for offences under sections 98 to 98B

(1) A judicial officer cannot be arrested without warrant for an offence under section 98, 98A or
98B of this Code.
[1966 No. 84.]
(2) No proceedings for an offence under section 98, 98A or 98B of this Code shall be instituted
against a judicial officer except on a complaint or information signed by or on behalf of the Attorney‐
General of the Federation or by or on behalf of the Attorney‐General of the State in which the offence is
alleged to have been committed.
(3) In this section, “judicial officer” means, in addition to the officers mentioned in the
definition
of that expression contained in section 1 (i) of this Code‐
(a) a member of a customary court;
(b) a member of a juvenile court;
(c) an arbitrator, umpire or referee;
(d) a person called upon to serve as an assessor in any civil or criminal proceedings;
(e) a member of a jury;
(f) a member of a tribunal of inquiry constituted under the Tribunals of Inquiry Act; and
[Cap. T21.]
(g) any person before whom, under any law in force in Nigeria or any part thereof, there
may be held proceedings in which evidence may be taken on oath.
[1966 No. 84.]

Section 98D of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Meaning of “public official” in sections 98 to 98B

In sections 98 to 98B of this Code, “public official” means any person employed in the public service
(within the meaning of that expression as defined in section 1 (i) or any judicial officer within the
meaning of section 98C of this Code.

Section 99 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Extortion by public officers

Any person who, being employed in the public service, takes, or accepts from any person, for the
performance of his duty as such officer, any reward beyond his proper pay and emoluments, or any
promise of such reward, is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for three years.

Section 100 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

(Deleted by 1966 No. 84).

Section 101 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Public officers interested in contracts

Any person who, being employed in the public service, knowingly acquires or holds, directly or
indirectly, otherwise than as a member of a registered joint stock company consisting of more than
twenty persons, a private interest in any contract or agreement which is made on account of the public
service with respect to any matter concerning the department of the service in which he is employed, is
guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for three years and to be fined at the discretion of the
court.
The offender cannot be arrested without warrant.

Section 102 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Officers charged with administration of property of a special character or with special duties

Any person who, being employed in the public service, and being charged by virtue of his employment
with any judicial or administrative duties respecting property of a special character, or respecting the
carrying on of any manufacture, trade, or business of a special character, and having acquired or
holding, directly or indirectly, a private interest in any such property, manufacture, trade, or business,
discharges any such duties with respect to the property, manufacture, trade or business in which he has
such interest, or with respect to the conduct of any person in relation thereto, is guilty of a
misdemeanor and is liable to imprisonment for one year.

Section 103 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

False claims by officials

Any person who, being employed in the public service in such a capacity as to require him or to enable
him to furnish returns or statements touching any sum payable or claimed to be payable to himself or to
any other person, or touching any other matter required to be certified for the purpose of any payment
of money or delivery of goods to be made to any person, makes a return or statement touching any such
matter which is, to his knowledge, false in any material particular, is guilty of a felony and is liable to
imprisonment for three years.

Section 104 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Abuse of office

Any person who, being employed in the public service, does or directs to be done in abuse of the
authority of his office, any arbitrary act prejudicial to the rights of another, is guilty of a misdemeanour
and is liable to imprisonment for two years.
If the act is done or directed to be done for purposes of gain he is guilty of a felony, and is liable to
imprisonment for three years.
The offender cannot be arrested without warrant.
A prosecution for any offence under this or any of the last three preceding sections shall not be
instituted except by or with the consent of a law officer.

Section 105 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

False certificates by public officers

Any person who, being authorised or required by law to give any certificate touching any matter by
virtue whereof the rights of any person may be prejudicially affected, gives a certificate which is, to his
knowledge, false in any material particular, is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for three
years.

Section 106 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Administering extra‐judicial oaths

Any person who administers an oath or takes a solemn declaration or affirmation or affidavit touching
any matter with respect to which he has not by law any authority to do so, is guilty of a misdemeanour
and is liable to imprisonment for one year. This section does not apply to an oath, declaration,
affirmation, or affidavit, administered or taken before a peace officer in any matter relating to the
preservation of the peace or the punishment of offences, or relating to inquiries respecting sudden
death; nor to an oath, declaration, affirmation, or affidavit, administered or taken for some purpose
which is lawful under the laws of another country, or for the purpose of giving validity to an instrument
in writing which is intended to be used in another country.

Section 107 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

False assumption of authority

Any person who‐
(a) not being a judicial officer, assumes to act as a judicial officer; or
(b) without authority assumes to act as a person having authority by law to administer an oath or take a
solemn declaration or affirmation or affidavit, or to do any other act of a public nature which can only
be done by persons authorised by law to do so; or
(c) represents himself to be a person authorised by law to sign a document testifying to the contents of
any register or record kept by lawful authority, or testifying to any fact or event, and signs such
document as being so authorised, when he is not, and knows that he is not, in fact, so authorised,
is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for three years.
The offender cannot be arrested without warrant.

Section 108 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Personating public officers

Any person who‐
(1) personates any person employed in the public service on an occasion when the latter is required to
do any act or attend in any place by virtue of his employment; or
(2) falsely represents himself to be a person employed in the public service, and assumes to do any act
or to attend in any place for the purpose of doing any act by virtue of such employment,
is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for three years.

Section 109 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Personating members of armed forces or police

Any person who, not being a person serving in the armed forces of Nigeria nor a member of the police
forces and with intent that he may be taken to be such a person or member as aforesaid‐
[L.N. 112 of 1964.]
(a) wears any part of the uniform of; or
(b) wears any garb resembling any part of the uniform of, a person serving in the armed forces of
Nigeria, or a member of the police forces, is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for
one year.

Section 110 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Unlawfully wearing the uniform of the armed forces

Any person who‐
[L.N. 112 of 1964. 1967 No. 27.]
(1) not being a person serving in any of the armed forces of Nigeria, wears the uniform or any part of the
uniform of such forces, or any dress having the appearance or bearing any of the regimental or other
distinctive marks of such uniforms; or
(2) not being a person holding any office or authority under the Government of Nigeria or of any part
thereof, wears any uniform or distinctive badge or mark or carries any token calculated to convey the
impression that such person holds any office or authority under the government,
is guilty of an offence and is liable to imprisonment for one month or to a fine of ten naira, unless he
proves that he had the permission of the President or of the Governor of a State to wear such uniform
or dress, badge or mark or to carry such token:
Provided that this section of this Code shall not apply to the wearing of any uniform or dress in the
course of a stage play or in any bona fide public entertainment.

Section 111 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Selling, etc., uniform, etc., to unauthorised persons

Any person who sells or gives any uniform, or part of a uniform, or any dress, badge or mark, as in
section 110 of this Code to any person who is not authorised to wear the same, is guilty of an offence
and is liable to the penalties prescribed in the said section.

Credit: https://lawsofnigeria.placng.org/laws/C38.pdf

Section 69-88A of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 69-88A of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 69 to 88A of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act is under Chapter 10 (Unlawful assemblies: breaches of the peace) of the Act.

Section 69 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Definitions: Unlawful assembly. Riot

When three or more persons, with intent to carry out some common purpose, assemble in such a
manner or, being assembled, conduct themselves in such a manner as to cause persons in the
neighbourhood to fear on reasonable grounds that the persons so assembled will tumultuously disturb
the peace, or will by such assembly needlessly and without any reasonable occasion provoke other
persons tumultuously to disturb the peace, they are an unlawful assembly.
It is immaterial that the original assembling was lawful if, being assembled; they conduct themselves
with a common purpose in such a manner as aforesaid.

An assembly of three or more persons who assemble for the purpose of protecting any house against
persons threatening to break and enter the house in order to commit a felony or misdemeanour therein
is not an unlawful assembly.
When an unlawful assembly has begun to act in so tumultuous a manner as to disturb the peace, the
assembly is called a riot, and the persons assembled are said to be riotously assembled.

Section 70 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Punishment of unlawful assembly

Any person who takes part in an unlawful assembly is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to
imprisonment for one year.

Section 71 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Punishment of riot

Any person who takes part in a riot is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for three years.

Section 72 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Making proclamation for rioters to disperse

Any magistrate or, in his absence, any police officer, of or above the rank of assistant superintendent, or
any commissioned officer in the Naval, Military or Air Forces of Nigeria in whose view a riot is being
committed, or who apprehends that a riot is about to be committed by persons assembled within his
view, may make or cause to be made a proclamation in the name of the Federal Republic in such form as
he thinks fit, commanding the rioters or persons so assembled to disperse peaceably.
[L.N. 112 of 1964.]

Section 73 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Dispersion of rioters after proclamation made

If upon the expiration of a reasonable time after such proclamation is made, or after the making of such
proclamation has been prevented by force, twelve or more persons continue riotously assembled
together, any person authorised to make proclamation, or any police officer, or any other person acting
in aid of such person or police officer, may do all things necessary for dispersing the persons so
continuing assembled, or for apprehending them or any of them, and, if any person makes resistance,
may use all such force as is reasonably necessary for overcoming such resistance, and shall not be liable
in any criminal or civil proceeding for having, by the use of such force, caused harm or death to any
person.

Section 74 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Rioting after proclamation

If proclamation is made, commanding the persons engaged in a riot, or assembled with the purpose of
committing a riot, to disperse, every person who, at or after the expiration of a reasonable time from
the making of such proclamation, takes or continues to take part in the riot or assembly is guilty of a
felony and is liable to imprisonment for five years.

Section 75 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Preventing or obstructing the making of proclamation

Any person who forcibly prevents or obstructs the making of such proclamation as is in section 75 of this
Code, is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for ten years; and if the making of the
proclamation is so prevented, every person who, knowing that it has been so prevented, takes or
continues to take part in the riot or assembly is liable to imprisonment for five years.

Section 76 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Rioters demolishing buildings, machinery, railway, etc.

Any persons who, being riotously assembled together, unlawfully pull down or destroy, or begin to pull
down or destroy any building, railway, machinery or structures are guilty of a felony and each of them is
liable to imprisonment for life.

Section 77 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Rioters injuring buildings, machinery, railway, etc.

Any persons who, being riotously assembled together, unlawfully damage any of the things in section 77
of this Code, are guilty of a felony and each of them is liable to imprisonment for seven years.

Section 78 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Smuggling or rescuing goods under arms

Any persons who assemble together to the number of three or more armed with firearms, bows and
arrows, spears, swords, knives, or other dangerous or offensive weapons, in order to effect or aid in
effecting any of the following purposes‐
(a) the unlawful shipping, unshipping, loading, moving, or carrying away of any goods the
importation of which is prohibited, or any goods liable to customs duties, which duties
have not been paid or secured;
(b) the rescuing or taking of any such goods from any person authorised to seize them, or
from any person employed by him, or assisting him, or from any place where any such
person has put them;
(c) the rescuing of any person who has been arrested on a charge of any offence relating to
the customs;
(d) the prevention of the arrest of any person guilty of any such offence, or of any person
aiding in effecting any of the purposes in this section,
are guilty of a felony and each of them is liable to imprisonment for seven years.

Section 79 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Smuggling under arms or in disguise

Any persons who are found assembled together, to the number of six or more, having with them any
goods liable to forfeiture under any law relating to the customs, and carrying firearms, bows and arrows,
spears, swords, knives, or other dangerous or offensive weapons, or disguised, are guilty of a felony and
each of them is liable to imprisonment for seven years.

Section 80 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Going armed so as to cause fear

Any person who goes armed in public without lawful occasion in such a manner as to cause terror to any
person is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for two years and his arms may be
forfeited.

Section 81 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Forcible entry

Any person who, in a manner likely to cause a breach of the peace or reasonable apprehension of a
breach of the peace, enters on land which is in actual and peaceable possession of another, is guilty of a
misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for one year.
It is immaterial whether he is entitled to enter on the land or not.

Section 82 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Forcible detainer

Any person who, being in actual possession of land without colour of right, holds possession of it, in a
manner likely to cause a breach of the peace or reasonable apprehension of a breach of the peace,
against a person entitled by law to the possession of the land, is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable
to imprisonment for one year.

Section 83 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Affray

Any person who takes part in a fight in a public place is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to
imprisonment for one year.

Section 84 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Challenge to fight a duel

Any person who challenges another to fight a duel, or attempts to provoke another to fight a duel, or
attempts to provoke any person to challenge another to fight a duel, is guilty of a felony, and is liable to
imprisonment for three years.

Section 85 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Prize fight

Any person who fights in a prize fight, or subscribes to or promotes a prize fight, is guilty of a
misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for one year.

Section 86 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Threatening violence

Any person who(
1) with intent to intimidate or annoy any person, threatens to break or injure a dwelling‐house;
or
(2) with intent to alarm any person in a dwelling‐house, discharges loaded firearms or commits
any other breach of the peace,
is guilty of a misdemeanour and is liable to imprisonment for one year.
If the offence is committed in the night the offender is guilty of a felony and IS liable to imprisonment
for three years.

Section 87 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Assembling for the purpose of smuggling

Any persons who assemble together, to the number of three or more, for the purpose of unshipping,
carrying or concealing, any goods subject to customs duty and liable to forfeiture under any law relating
to the customs, are guilty of a misdemeanour and each of them is liable to a fine not exceeding two
hundred naira or to imprisonment for six months.

Section 88 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Unlawful processions

(1) Any persons who assemble together, to the number of three or more, under any of the
following circumstances‐
(a) bearing or wearing or having amongst them any firearms, bows and arrows, spear,
sword, knife, or other offensive weapon; or
(b) publicly exhibiting any banner, emblem, flag, or symbol, the displaying of which is
calculated to promote animosity between persons of different religious faiths or
different factions; or
(c) being accompanied by any music, beating of drums, or other noise calculated to
promote such animosity,
and, being so assembled, join in any parade or procession for the purpose of celebrating or
commemorating any festival, anniversary, or event relating to or connected with any religious or other
distinction or difference between persons residing in Nigeria or of demonstrating any such religious or
other distinction or difference, are guilty of an offence and each of them is liable to imprisonment for
one month.
If the offender is himself bearing or wearing firearms, a bow and arrows, spear, sword, knife or any
other offensive weapon he is liable to imprisonment for six months.

(2) When three or more persons are so assembled together it is the duty of a peace officer to
make or cause to be made a command in the name of the President, in such words as he thinks fit, to
the persons assembled to disperse peaceably.
Any persons who, being so assembled, continue together to the number of three or more, and do not
disperse themselves within the space of a quarter of an hour after the giving of the command, are guilty
of an offence and each of them is liable to imprisonment for three years.
(3) A judicial officer may issue a warrant in the first instance for the arrest of any such offender,
either on the oath of a credible person or on his own view.

Section 88A of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Provoking breach of peace by offensive publication

(1) Any person who‐
(a) in any manner or form publishes or displays or offers to the public the pictorial
representation of any person living or dead in a manner likely to provoke any section of
the community; or
[1966 No. 44.]
(b) publishes or circulates publications either in the form of newspapers, or leaflets,
periodicals, pamphlets or posters, if such publications are likely to provoke or bring into
disaffection any section of the community; or
(c) sings songs, plays any instrument or recording of sounds, or sells, lends, or lets on hire
any
record of sounds, the words of which are likely to provoke any section of the community,
is guilty of an offence for which he may be arrested without warrant by any police officer or member of
the armed forces in uniform, and upon conviction is liable to a fine of one hundred naira or to
imprisonment for a term of three months, or to both such fine and imprisonment; and the court
convicting may order confiscation of any material (including records) used for purposes contemplated by
this section and of any instrument used in connection therewith.

(2) Where any person is subsequently convicted of the like or any other offence under this
section of this Code, the penalty shall be the maximum prescribed for the offence.

(3) It shall be a defence to any person charged under this section of this Code with selling,
lending or letting on hire of any record that after reasonable inquiry was made by him before the sale,
lending or hiring out as the case may be, (the proof of which inquiry shall lie upon the person charged
with the offence), he was unaware of the possibility that it might be used for purposes mentioned in
subsection (1) of this Code, and thereafter withdrew the record from sale or recalled any record lent or
hired out by him.

(4) This section of this Code shall have effect notwithstanding any other penalty which may be
prescribed for an offence of a similar nature in any criminal code or penal code in force in Nigeria.
Interpretation

(5) In this section, unless the context otherwise requires‐
“pictorial representation” includes any photograph, and any plate or film, positive or negative;
“recorded” means sounds collected or stored by means of any tape, disc, cylinder or other means
whatsoever where the sounds are capable of being reproduced or are intended for reproduction by
electrical or mechanical means at any time or from time to time thereafter, and includes the matrix,and
cognate expressions shall have the like meaning; “sounds” includes speech and mere noise.

Credit: https://lawsofnigeria.placng.org/laws/C38.pdf (As well as many other posts in this category – ‘Nigerian Criminal Code Act‘.

Section 61-68 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 61-68 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Section 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act is under Chapter 8 (Offences against the executive and legislative power) and Chapter 9 (Unlawful societies) of the Act.

Section 61 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Interference with executive or legislative power

Any person who advisedly does any unlawful act calculated to interfere with the free exercise by the
President or a Governor of the duties or authority of his office or with the free exercise by a member of
the Federal Executive Council, or a State Executive Council of his duties as such member, is guilty of a
felony, and is liable to imprisonment for three years.
[L.N. 2 of 1960. L.N. 112 of 1964. 1967 No. 27.]
The offender cannot be arrested without warrant.
A prosecution for an offence under this section shall not be instituted except by or with the consent of a
law officer.

Section 62 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Definition of society and unlawful society

(1) A society includes any combination of ten or more persons whether the society be known by
any name or not.
[L.N. 258 of 1959. 1967 No. 27.]
(2) A society is an unlawful society‐
(i) if formed for any of the following purposes‐
(a) levying war or encouraging or assisting any person to levy war on the Government or
the inhabitants of any part of Nigeria; or
(b) killing or injuring or encouraging the killing or injuring of any person; or
(c) destroying or injuring or encouraging the destruction or injuring of any property; or
(d) subverting or promoting the subversion of the Government or of its officials; or
(e) committing or inciting to acts of violence or intimidation; or
(f) interfering with, or resisting, or encouraging interference with or resistance to the
administration of the law; or
(g) disturbing or encouraging the disturbance of peace and order in any part of Nigeria; or
(ii) if declared by an order of the President to be a society dangerous to the good
government of Nigeria or of any part thereof.

Section 62A of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Unlawful societies in a State

Without prejudice to the provisions of section 62 of this Code, a society is an unlawful society if it is
declared by an order of the President to be a society dangerous to the good government of Nigeria or of
any part thereof, and for such purpose the consent of the Attorney‐General of the Federation referred
to in section 65 of this Code shall be construed as a reference to the consent of the Attorney‐General of
the State.
[L.N. 148 of 1959. L.N. 22 of 1960.]

Section 63 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Managing an unlawful society

Any person who manages or assists in the management of an unlawful society is guilty of a felony and is
liable to imprisonment for seven years.

Section 64 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Members of unlawful society: persons permitting an unlawful society to meet on their premises

Any person who-
a) is a member of an unlawful society; or
(b) knowingly allows a meeting of an unlawful society, or of members of an unlawful
society, to be held in any house, building, or place belonging to, or occupied by, him or
over which he has control,
is guilty of a felony and is liable to imprisonment for three years.

Section 65 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Provisions relating to prosecution for offences under sections 63 and 64

(1) A prosecution for an offence under the two last preceding sections shall not be instituted
except with the consent of the Attorney‐General of the Federation:
[L.N. 148 of 1959.]
Provided that a person charged with such an offence may be arrested or a warrant for his arrest
may be issued and executed, and any such person may be remanded in custody or on bail,
notwithstanding that the consent of the Attorney‐General of the Federation to the institution of a
prosecution for the offence has not been obtained, but no further or other proceedings shall be taken
until that consent has been obtained.

(2) In any prosecution for an offence under sections 63 and 64 of this Code it shall not be
necessary to prove that the society consisted of ten or more members; but it shall be sufficient to prove
the existence of a combination of persons, and the onus shall then rest with the accused to prove that
the number of members of such combination did not amount to ten.

(3) Any person who attends a meeting of an unlawful society shall be presumed, until and unless
the contrary is proved, to be a member of the society.

(4) Any person who has in his possession or custody or under his control any of the insignia,
banners, arms, books, papers, documents, or other property belonging to an unlawful society, or wears
any of the insignia or is marked with any mark of the society, shall be presumed, unless and until the
contrary is proved, to be a member of the society.

Section 66 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Powers of peace officers in relation to unlawful societies

Any peace officer, and any officer authorised in writing by a peace officer, may enter with or without
assistance any house or building or into any place in which he has reason to believe that a meeting of an
unlawful society, or of persons who are members of an unlawful society, is being held, and to arrest or
cause to be arrested all persons found therein and to search such house, building, or place, and seize or
cause to be seized all insignia, banners, arms, books, papers, documents and other property which he
may have reasonable cause to believe to belong to any unlawful society or to be in any way connected
with the purpose of the meeting.

Section 67 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Disposition of property of society declared to be an unlawful society

(1) When a society is declared to be an unlawful society by an order of the President, the
following consequences shall ensue‐
[L.N. 257 of 1959. 1967 No. 27.]
(a) the property of the society within Nigeria shall forthwith vest in an officer appointed by
the President;
(b) the officer appointed by the President shall proceed to wind up the affairs of the
society, and, after satisfying and providing for all debts and liabilities of the society and
the costs of the winding up, if there shall then be any surplus assets, shall prepare and
submit to the President a scheme for the application of such surplus assets;
(c) such scheme, when submitted for approval, may be amended by the President in such
way as he shall think proper in the circumstances of the case;
(d) the approval of the President to such scheme shall be denoted by the endorsement
thereon of a memorandum of such approval signed by the President, and, upon this
being done, the surplus assets, the subject of the scheme, shall be held by such officer
upon the terms and to the purposes thereby prescribed;
(e) for the purpose of the winding up, the officer appointed by the President shall have all
the powers vested in a magistrate for the purpose of the discovering of the property of
a debtor and the realisation thereof.
(2) The President may, for the purpose of enabling a society to wind up its own affairs, suspend
the operation of this section of this Code for such period as to him shall seem expedient.
(3) The provisions of subsection (1) of this section shall not apply to any property seized at any
time under section 66 of this Code.

Section 68 of the Nigerian Criminal Code Act

Forfeiture

Subject to the provisions of section 67 of this Code, the insignia, banners, arms, books, papers,
documents and other property belonging to an unlawful society shall be forfeited to the State and shall
be dealt with in such manner as the President may direct.
[L.N. 257 of 1959. L.N. 112 of 1964. 1967 No. 27.]